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10 Facts About Mold That You May Not Know

Do you know all the facts about mold that you should? The average person isn’t educated about mold, and most people don’t seek answers or do their research until they have found mold in their home or have been affected by mold in some way.

Mold affects more people than you might think. Mold is everywhere. It surrounds us. In one way or another, mold affects us all! You may even be exposed to it right now whether you know it or not. Because it is so predominant in our world, there are some basic facts about mold that everyone should know. Here are 10 facts about mold that you may not know … but should!
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MoldBlogger Interview: Lisa and Ron Beres

Q. Being advocates for healthy homes, how often do you get contacted concerning black mold and how to remove it?

Lisa: We get contacted quite often for mold inquiries from people all across the country, but most people are unaware if they actually have mold, the scope of the problem or how to properly remove it. Many people will experience hay fever like symptoms, but if they can’t see visible mold, they tend to think it doesn’t exist or isn’t a real threat.

Ron: We always start by advising the person test, not guess. Too many people unknowingly put themselves and/or their loved ones in danger by ignoring the visible signs of moisture or water damage and/or a musty smell. They assume it will go away on its own. Many people wait too long before addressing the root cause of the issue – typically a leaky water source.
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mold on wood furniture

5 Ways to Remove Mold on Furniture

An Uncomfortable Situation

Black mold is absolutely horrible and can do more than simply ruin the way your furniture looks. The stuff can cause serious health problems if you don’t deal with it right away and clean your furniture thoroughly. The most common household product used to get rid of this nasty mold is bleach, but even that could be toxic and do more harm than good.
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bleach to clean mold

5 Misconceptions About Mold That Could Change Your Life (Part 2 of 5)

Under many common conditions mold can be serious, and given time could possibly lead to severe health complications. In this five part series I hope to tackle and explain some of the biggest misconceptions about mold.

Misconception 2 of 5 – If you have a mold problem bleach will get rid of it, always and forever.

I hear this one a lot. If a mold problem develops, many will grab some bleach, pour it on, and think they’ve kissed their mold problems good bye. If this is the typical scenario, their battle with mold has only just begun.

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cleaning mold with bleach

3 Reasons Why You Should Never Use Bleach To Clean Mold

Mold is not a topic that most homeowners want to think about. If they are discussing mold, it is likely because they have discovered some mold in their home, and as it can be both dangerous and costly, the chances are if you have found some you are desperately trying to determine how to get rid of it as soon as possible.

You may be wondering if you can do the remediation yourself and if so, what type of chemicals or cleaners you should use. Luckily for you, we’re here with those answers!
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carpet mold and mildew removal

Preventing Carpet Mold and Mildew

If you have recently washed your carpet or you have issues with excessive moisture in your home, then you should be aware that it is a situation where mildew and mold may grow well. This is an excellent opportunity for them to use the abundant water present in it as a nourishing source of food, which makes it doubly important for you to keep your carpet clean and dry as often as possible so you won’t have it be the host of such growth. Many people are allergic to mold and mildew so you will do well if you avoid having it in your home where it may eventually enter your lungs and your body. The following tips will give you some insight into what you can do to keep it out of your life. Read More

What can I do to remove and prevent mold in a home halfway below ground?

Question


I live in a basement flat built in about 1910, with no central heating system. Half my flat is below ground and I was told that the damp coursing had been completed. My main problem is in hidden and now open areas all over my flat I have black mould growing and a damp smell through the flat. I regularly wash the walls in bleach to inhibit it but always find more, the paint is peeling off my walls in the worse affected areas. My shoes I don’t regularly use, which I stored at the end of my hall all have white mould growing on tham and smell damp and now my Sofa and curtains smell damp too. I have a dehumidifer and try to ventilate, but I am aware that ventilation is not too good due to window placement. What else can I do to inhibit this or stop it? I spend most of my time at home sniffing trying to find the next patch.

Answer


You’re definitely in a difficult situation. To begin, I’d like to recommend you read the following post that I did regarding mold remediation and prevention:

You’ve done well in trying to increase ventilation. Your most difficult problem is that half the flat is underground, which makes sunlight and airflow extremely difficult or impossible to get down there. If there is anything you can do, even if that means putting more windows in, to create better airflow or increased sunlight – definitely do it. You could also try putting an industrial strength fan in to aid in overall ventilation. The dehumidifier that you’re using is good as well.

Bleach is a good “extra” additive to do when trying to perform home mold remediation, but should not be used as the sole fighting ingredient. I would recommend getting a product that specifically deals with mold removal, like Concrobium, etc.

Another option you might want to look into is hiring a professional mold remediator. Also try to figure out the reason for mold growth. Is it the overall weather in your area? Is it because of a chronic leak? Or is it because the house is underground and away from immediate sunlight?

Depending on the reason, remediation can cost a significant amount of money to complete. Have you considered moving? Is that even possible? You need to evaluate your overall health and well-being as well as prioritize your options.

If you have any questions about what I’ve said, feel free to e-mail me back.

I wish you the best as you fight your personal battle with mold.

Joslyn Wold
MoldBlogger.com
Jasper, IN

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Mold Removal: 3 Tips to Do-It-Yourself

Mold Removal Tips

A flooded home can leave you feeling frustrated, especially when mold is involved, but what can you do? Are you worried about the dangers of black mold to you and your family?

Take back some control with these do-it-yourself mold removal tips.

Follow these three tips to ensure that your do-it-yourself mold removal project will run smoothly and safely.

Prepare Your Home

If the wiring in your home has been affected by mold, you’ll want to turn off the main power. When you’re done disinfecting your home, enlist the help of a professional electrician to make sure it’s safe to turn the electricity on again.

Check for leaks in the water system before you spray your home down. Rent a hose that allows you to spray a soap and water solution together.

Spray down every moldy item in your home from floor to ceiling.
If you haven’t spent time with heavy cleaning chemicals before, test yourself out by disinfecting a small area of your home to start.

If the fumes affect you too much, hire a professional mold remediator to disinfect the rest of your home.

Be Thorough

Mold removal requires you to be as meticulous as possible. After the mold has been washed away, use cleaning pads or a stiff brush to scour each surface.

You can use a commercial cleaner to scrub moldy surfaces after they’ve been sprayed, but any non-ammonia detergent will work just as well. Try a mixture of 1 ½ cups bleach* with a gallon of water for a simple, homemade solution. (Update: We no longer recommend using bleach for mold.)

Furniture, walls, floors, ceilings, and heating and cooling registers and ducts must all be disinfected with a solution that has a quaternary, pine-oil, or phenolic base.

To be safe, get rid of a foot extra of drywall above the flooding level. Call in a professional to get any area that you aren’t able to reach on your own.

Dry each area for at least two days. If you don’t, the mold will return.

Soft materials such as rags, clothes, paper and even heavily affected carpet will retain mold spores even after disinfecting and drying. Throw these items away in sealed bags.

Protect Yourself

When you’re ridding your home of mold, the cure can be as dangerous as the illness.

To keep yourself safe from both mold and cleaning solution fumes, keep your home well ventilated throughout the cleaning. Take frequent breaks to get some fresh air.

Buy a mask or a particle remover respirator at a hardware store to protect you from mold spores released during the drying process.

Because respirators don’t protect you from fumes coming from disinfectants such as bleach, spend as little time as possible around these chemicals.

Always wear gloves when you’re handling anything containing mold and dispose of the gloves when you are finished with your project.

Disinfect Your Home

When you’re finished doing all you can to disinfect your home, you may want to hire a licensed contractor to check your work.

A professional can help you find any mold that you missed or assure you that your do-it-yourself mold removal project was a success.

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