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Dangers of Anti-Microbial Soaps

The Dangers of Anti-Microbial Soaps

 

The Purpose of Hygiene

Excellent hygiene practices are an individual’s—and community’s—first defense against disease and illness. If ill health is already a factor, continual hygiene supports and enables the body to battle pathogens and heal itself. Without it, new and frequent microorganisms, including mold and yeast, would make contact and infiltrate the body on a daily basis, creating health concerns or compounding those that already exist.

The prevailing reason to engage in consistent hygiene practices is to prevent disease. When hygiene is performed correctly, the body and all its processes are able to function at their best. Inadequate—or altogether lacking—hygiene permits an overabundance of harmful bacteria, viruses, and fungi to accumulate throughout the body. The “bad” microbes then proliferate at such a pace that the “good” microbes quickly become outnumbered and unable to ward off the offending colonies. Once its defenses are breached, the body responds with typical symptoms of compromised well-being.
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cinnamon sticks

Fighting Mold with Cinnamon Essential Oil

Mold is everywhere, and toxic molds often take root within homes and other buildings. Water leaks and damp environments fuel the fugal growth and the proliferation of mold spores in the environment. Once mold is discovered, a safe and effective treatment is necessary to prevent further damage to building structure and the health of those who are exposed. One common cleaning method, chlorine bleach, is neither a safe nor an effective solution. However, essential oils are becoming known as a harmless and potent method to fight molds.
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lavender flowers

Essential Oil Sprays and Herbal Medicines: Battling Mold Naturally

Mold is an opportunistic fungal microorganism that needs moisture, darkness, and decomposing organic material (nutrients) to survive. The spores (reproductive agents) are most-often carried on air currents, floating in and out of human living spaces by the thousands (sometimes millions).  In other cases, the spores land on a person or animal and are then transferred from one possible habitat to another.  As long as there is a dark, damp, and warm place with spoiling food, dead insects, wood, or even dust (which originates from human skin cells), mold can grow just about anywhere it lands.
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