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How to remove mold stains?

There are 5 steps that can be followed to remove mold stains:

  1. First take the item outside, so as not to spread mold spores indoors, and brush as much of the mold off as you can.
  2. Allow the item to dry in the sun for awhile, as direct sunlight can often kill many different types of mold spores.
  3. After plenty of sunlight has been distributed evenly over the item, presoak it in cold water possibly with a bleach solution, color safe if it has colors in it, and then machine wash it with warm water and detergent.
  4. Lemon juice and salt in cold water has also been used with colored fabrics, as well as a vinegar solution to aid in smell removal.
  5. Hang the item in the sun again to dry.

Unfortunately, mold does leave stains but by using the previous solution and washing materials in this manner, you have rid the items of mold and most likely the musty smell as well, however removing mold stains is an entirely different matter.

Note Also:

Here are a couple of ideas that I haven’t prove my self, but that may be worth trying.

  • X-14 Mildew Stain Remover with Bleach will often remove the stains.
  • Try mixing 2 cap fulls of Milton baby sterilizing fluid with 3-4 liters of water and soak the item over night.

Further Recommended Reading:

Joslyn from the MoldBlogger team

How do you remove mold from hats?

There are 5 steps that can be followed to remove mold from hats:

  1. First take the hat outside, so as not to spread mold spores indoors, and brush as much of the mold off as you can.
  2. Allow your hat to dry in the sun for awhile, as direct sunlight can often kill many different types of mold spores.
  3. After plenty of sunlight has been distributed evenly over your hat, presoak it in cold water possibly with a bleach solution (color safe if your hat has colors in it) and then machine wash it with warm water and detergent.
  4. Lemon juice and salt in cold water has also been used with colored fabrics, as well as a vinegar solution to aid in smell removal.
  5. Hang your hat in the sun again to dry.

The hat may or may not still have stains but the mold and dangerous spores will be gone. If stains persist, try washing the garment again.

Joslyn from the MoldBlogger team

How do you remove mold from a life jacket?

There are 5 steps that can be followed to remove mold from hats:

  1. Depending on the material, first scrape the mold from the jacket outside to prevent mold spores spreading in your home.
  2. Allow the jacket to sun dry for a while preferrably on the clothes line so the jacket receives sunlight evenly. Many mold spores can be killed just by direct sunlight.
  3. Soak the jacket in cold water possibly with bleach if you want, (color safe for colors) and then machine wash in warm water with detergent.
  4. Lemon juice and salt in cold water has also been used with colored fabrics, as well as a vinegar solution to aid in smell removal.
  5. Allow the jacket to sun dry.

The jacket may or may not still have stains but the mold and dangerous spores will be gone. If stains persist, try washing the garment again.

Joslyn from the MoldBlogger team

Flooded Oklahoma Town Facing Mold Problems

Excerpt:

An Oklahoma town that was the scene of severe flooding earlier this month is now having problems with mold.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency said the mold problems in some parts of Blackwell could be hazardous to the health of the residents there.

Comments:

With Hurricane season in full swing, this story is a good sample of what many other towns will be facing as they deal with an explosion in mold growth within the affected areas.

Further Recommended Reading:

Source: KOCO News 5

Where can I purchase “mildicides”?

Question:

Where can I purchase “mildicides”? I need a fogger type substance for my closets/furniture. Also, does charcoal work as a molder smell reducer?

Answer:

You can find basic mildicides at walmart, home depot, or other such department stores. Charcoal, in theory, may work for reducing smell if you are looking for something natural like that, though I would think baking soda would work better.

For those interested in biodegradable mildicides, until a vendor comes forward and takes the step towards being green or we’re able to find an available product (whichever comes first), we encourage you to keep on looking.

I wish you the best,

Joslyn Wold
The MoldBlogger Team

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