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bathroom cleaning tips

Tips For Cleaning Your Bathroom

It’s all very well harping on about the fact that the bathroom is one of the places in the home most susceptible to mold and, thereby, the importance of keeping it clean. But in real terms, what does this actually mean? Let’s break it down in an article dedicated to bathroom cleaning tips and tricks.

Bath

Cleaning may be the last thing on your mind after a nice relaxing bath, but if you want to keep limescale away rinse and dry it after every use. This should complement a regular cleaning routine with an all-purpose bathroom product to prevent dirt from accumulating. Repeat for basins, too. Have an enamel-coated cast iron or steel bath? Cleaning should be the same, ensuring you only use recommended products for the material (this goes for every surface in the bathroom); limescale here should be treated with either an equal parts solution of white vinegar and water, applied with a soft cloth, or a damp sponge dipped in bicarbonate of soda.

Floor

Sweep and mop with soapy water mixed with some bleach, paying particular attention to the areas around the bottom of the toilet as this area is notoriously dirty. Use a wet paper towel to collect dust and hairs – usually clustered in the corners of the room.

Grout

A popular hub for mold, use a fungicidal bathroom spray regularly to prevent regrowth or go natural with a paste made up of three parts bicarbonate of soda one part water.

Removable items

It can be tempting to just clean around things like your soap dish and toothbrush holder, but moving them away properly so you can reach every inch of the surface is vital in combatting dirt, grime and mold.

Showers

Leave the door, window and/or curtain open after showering to combat the humidity that encourages mold to grow. Nylon shower curtains can be put in the washing machine and should be done every month to stop mildew build up, whilst other materials should be hand washed. Pay special attention to folding shower screens – especially around the hinges. Use a descaler on the showerhead once a month, scrubbing with a toothbrush. (Top tip: An old toothbrush, applied with a small amount of bleach or other cleaning product is great for all areas in the bathroom as it can get into tiny nooks and crannies.) If you find that it is particularly clogged up, you can remove it and soak in a mixture of vinegar and water overnight. Wet tiles should be wiped to stop watermarks from forming whilst the shower tray should be scrubbed with an all-purpose bathroom cleaner.

Taps

Wipe and buff taps after every use and clean regularly with washing-up liquid.

Toilet

Use a toilet brush and cleaner with added disinfectant, paying particular attention under the rim. Wipe the outside of the bowl and the cistern with an all-purpose bathroom cleaner, making sure you don’t neglect the flush as this harbors lots of bacteria. Coat the inside of the bowl with an acidic cleaner, taking special care to work from the inside rim as it will then drop down to cover the entire surface. Washing soda will clear limescale from inside the bowl and should be sprinkled in and scrubbed with the toilet brush, left to soak overnight and flushed in the morning. For a greener alternative, a tablespoon of baking powder into a mixture of white vinegar and water works wonders, too. As for toilet brushes – probably the cesspit of grime in the whole house – make sure you clean these at least once a week with a mixture of hot soapy water and a few drops of bleach. Even better – keep it standing in bleach at all times. Treat yourself to a new one every year – excuse the pun but you can really, er, ‘splash out’ on this one!

Walls, windows and ceilings

If you find mold on any of these surfaces, spray with a disinfectant and let it rest for a couple of minutes before scrubbing. Keep windows open as much as possible and fans ventilated to discourage the growth of mold. For some extra reading on ventilation, check out our article on the benefits of a clean bathroom exhaust fan.

And finally …

We couldn’t let this article pass without a reference to cross-contamination between the bathroom and kitchen. As spokesperson from catering company, Nisbets, explains, you should “separate cleaning equipment by area and use,  ensuring you don’t mop the kitchen floor with the same mop as the toilet floor”.

So, before you Google a professional bathroom cleaning service, why not give it a go yourself? You never know, you might even enjoy it!

Any tips you swear by that we’ve missed? Let us know in the comments below!

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